cult and paste

be careful where you clique

depending on things you don’t understand

Being Dependent upon things we don’t understand is nothing new.

It’s only what we are dependent upon that changes.

We used to depend on gods to bring the meat and potatoes.

Today we depend on virtual widgets collecting wireless data from weather satellites that predict the probability of rain.

1. Increasing complexity does not necessarily imply progress

2. Often complexity is unnecessary, and when it is, you can bet someone is gaining from it.

If we were all more selective with our complexities, we would be in a much better predicament.

————————————————

At MIT, Paul Griffith wrote a thesis entitled “self replicating machines”, a clever idea taken from nature.

in nature, it was the ribozyme that was believed to be the springboard to all self-replicating life. Imagine a string of data that can copy itself. And then… complexity and possibility.

Anyway back to Paul Griffith, in a recent interview, the guardian newspaper tried to nail down exactly how much energy the internet as a machine was consuming. The best estimates from independent studies is that the internet uses 1-3% of total world energy consumption.

Paul scoffed at the idea, noting all the complexities and externalities that don’t get included in the count. Says he, “Part of the reason humanity is in the situation it is with climate change is that we weren’t measuring how we were using energy and understanding the consequences.”

Notice he says humanity, not life…. life will be just fine.

 

 

 

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This entry was posted on December 30, 2011 by in Economics, Ecosystems, History, Nature, Science, Technology.
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